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November 8, 2011

Black Voters' Support for Obama Is Steady and Strong

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Abdul Malik seems the prototype of a disenchanted Barack Obama voter. Mr. Malik, 48, lost his job as a grading and landscape worker a year and a half ago, another victim of the housing bust. Since then, he has been searching for something, anything, to help make ends meet.

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November 4, 2011

Be a Part of History: A Celebration of the 56th Anniversary of the Montgomery Bus Boycott

The Mass Meetings of the Montgomery Bus Boycott: The Prophet and the People. Guest Speaker: Rev. Calvin Butts Pastor, Abyssianian Baptist Church New York, New York.

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November 3, 2011

Making Bricks Without Straw: The Dual Role of Black Principals in Alabama's Segregated School Systems

In Observance of the 90th National Education Week.

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October 31, 2011

Birmingham says farewell to Fred Shuttlesworth

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — In a story Oct. 24 about the funeral of the Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the Rev. Jesse Jackson attended the funeral. Jackson was listed on the funeral program, but did not attend.

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College Board: Despite Higher Tuitions, Young Adults Increasingly Attending College

The College Board reports that, despite stagnant incomes and steadily rising tuitions, more students are pursuing college degrees because the return on investment has never been greater.

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Commentary: Falling Through the Cracks

The number of African-American male students in community colleges is significantly lower than their female and majority counterparts. In fact, more than a quarter of Black males leave community colleges within their first year. After three years, 55 percent will drop out without attaining a degree.

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Dillard University Gets $25M from National Institutes of Health

NEW ORLEANS - Dillard University is getting a $25 million, five-year grant to expand its research of health and health care inequalities between races and people in different parts of the country.

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NCAA Graduation Rate Hits All-Time High at 82 Percent

INDIANAPOLIS – College athletes are outperforming other students in the classroom, and they're doing it at a record rate.

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October 21, 2011

Southern University Trims Class Week

BATON ROUGE, La. – Southern University is switching to a four-day class week in January by doing away with Friday courses.

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Thousands Gather at National Mall to Dedicate Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial

WASHINGTON— Thousands of people gathered Sunday to give the new Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial a proper dedication on the National Mall after its opening in August.

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Commentary: We Have a Monument – But What Else?

At the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial recently, Georgetown Professor Christopher Metzler talked with some fifth- to eighth-grade students.

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Fred Shuttlesworth – Photos from The Birmingham News

Five days after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Montgomery city buses must integrate, the Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and others challenged the law in Birmingham by joining white passengers on a city bus. Shuttlesworth boarded the bus hours after a bomb exploded inside his Collegeville house

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Alabama State University civil rights center to honor Martin Luther King Jr.

MONTGOMERY, Alabama - Alabama State University will host a program honoring the legacy and spirit of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr.

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Amidst Soaring Poverty, New MLK Monument Should Be Seen as "Testament to [His] Unfinished Work"

A new report by the University of New Hampshire reveals that nearly 22 percent of America’s children live in poverty. Another study by the the Pew Hispanic Center found that Hispanics now make up the largest group of children living in poverty...

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Historian Wayne Flynt on HB56: 'The meanest, most hateful thing I've ever read'

Wayne Flynt may be a champion of the working poor, but he is an elitist when it comes to tomatoes. “It’s just a chauvinistic Southern thing,” said Flynt, the acclaimed Alabama writer, historian and Auburn University professor emeritus. “I prefer to eat Alabama tomatoes.”

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Alabama Frontier Days at Fort Toulouse / Jackson, Highway 231,Wetumpka, AL, November 2-6, 2011

The most authentic Living History event in the state, Alabama Frontier Days is a reenactment of Alabama's 18-19th century from French Colonial times to the early American period. Includes Native American reenactors, period traders, merchants and entertainers.

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Montgomery associates of Martin Luther King recall the man, share reactions on the monument

MONTGOMERY, Alabama -- Following a weekend when the entire nation called to mind the life of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.,  five people who actually knew the man held around 100 people on the edge of their seats here Tuesday with personal accounts of living and working alongside the civil rights icon during his time in Montgomery. 

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On The Mercy Seat: Troy Anthony Davis and American Capital Punishment

Johnny Cash’s classic rendition of the death row anthem, “The Mercy Seat,” at one point, filled the airwaves, thanks to what some have called the award-winning coverage of Amy Goodman’s Democracy Now!  Their video stream was one of few, if not the only nonstop, live broadcast outside the Georgia Diagnostic Prison, where 42 year-old Troy Anthony Davis, on death row for two decades, was scheduled for his turn on the “mercy seat.” 

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Importance of Being the Best Faculty Advisor Possible to Students of Color

I often talk about my strong feelings about mentoring, especially our obligation as faculty to mentor students of color. I mentor students throughout the country. I also care deeply about providing rich and rewarding advising experiences for my own students.

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Women of Color in STEM Fields

As a group, women are still the largest untapped talent pool for growing America’s science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM, workforce. Women of color, in particular, remain greatly underrepresented in STEM disciplines despite a growing population of racial/ethnic minority groups and a growing number of women and minorities attending college.

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Xavier University's Default Management Plan Win Praise

While Xavier University’s dynamic response to Hurricane Katrina is perhaps its best known accomplishment in the eyes of federal officials, the university’s aggressive approach in combating student loan defaults is another high-profile area of success.

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RX for Success: Xavier Ranks Among the Top Producers of Black Students Accepted by Medical School

The most authentic Living History event in the state, Alabama Frontier Days is a reenactment of Alabama's 18-19th century from French Colonial times to the early American period. Includes Native American reenactors, period traders, merchants and entertainers.

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Occupy Protesters Eye Diversity as Movement Grows

ATLANTA — Jason Woody immediately recognized a shared struggle with many of the Occupy Wall Street demonstrators: The 2007 college graduate has been out of work for two years, and it's been longer since he's seen a doctor. He also noticed something else – the lack of brown faces on the front lines of the Occupy movement.

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UA removes racial slurs chalked on campus building

TUSCALOOSA, Alabama -- University of Alabama President Robert Witt addressed Tuesday some offensive comments that were chalked on the side of Moody Music Building by an unknown person.

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Nat King Cole Society

He was one of the most famous singers of his time and the first major black entertainer to star in a network TV variety series, but some Alabamians, and even some Montgomeryians, don’t realize that Nat King Cole was born here.

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October 10, 2011

Justice Breyer Honors Federal Judge Responsible for Helping Desegregate Virginia Schools

RICHMOND, Va. – Unlike politicians, judges cannot let popularity influence their decisions, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer said Thursday.

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Fulbright Lessons From Around the World

Most of my teaching experiences have been in majority “minority” environments. Whether at a predominantly Black university or a high school a few miles from the Mexico/U.S. border, I’ve learned much from teaching and learning with people who probably check different racial/ethnic demographic boxes than I do.

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White House Black College Leader Urges Development of HBCU Online Programs

WASHINGTON, D.C. — HBCUs and the online learning community need to become “more married” to reach more African-American students and reverse the United States’ continual slippage from its former position as the most degreed nation in the world.

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VCU Launches Project on Massive Resistance

RICHMOND, Va. — Virginia Commonwealth University is launching an oral-history project that explores the Massive Resistance policy in Virginia during the 1950s and ‘60s.

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October 7, 2011

Blacks less likely to get research grants, study finds

Black researchers are far less likely to receive grant funding than white researchers, according to a new report published this week in the journal Science. The report, based on a survey of 80,000 grant applications to the National Institutes of Health made by 40,000 researchers, found that 29% of grants from white applicants were accepted while only 16% from black applicants made it through.

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October 5, 2011

Robert Bentley tells Alabama's Black Caucus he's working for 'the invisible people'

POINT CLEAR, Alabama -- Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley says he's working for the "invisible people." In a pair of back-to-back speeches delivered Friday in Point Clear, Bentley said his administration is tightly focused on creating jobs and improving the quality of life in Alabama - particularly for those at the bottom of the state's economic ladder.

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Fred Shuttlesworth, Birmingham civil rights legend, dies at 89

BIRMINGHAM, Alabama -- The Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, the driving force behind the Birmingham integration efforts in the 1950s and early 1960s that energized the national civil rights movement, died this morning.

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Students' Knowledge of Civil Rights History Has Deteriorated, Study Finds

When Julian Bond, the former Georgia lawmaker and civil rights activist, turned to teaching two decades ago, he often quizzed his college students to gauge their awareness of the civil rights movement. He did not want to underestimate their grasp of the topic or talk down to them, he said.

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Up From the Ashes, a Symbol That Hate Does Not Win

In the hours after the 2008 election of the country’s first African-American president, three white men crept up to a predominantly African-American church being built here in Springfield, blessed it corruptly with gasoline — and faded into the fresh November night.

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August 23, 2011

Students at India's Osmania University Learn About Common Ties to Black History That Bridge Cross-Cultural Understanding

HYDERABAD, India - With a microphone in hand and a computer linked up to a screen projector, an American history professor from Virginia recently took about two dozen students here at Osmania University on a whirlwind tour of the Black experience in America.

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August 15, 2011

Students File Lawsuit Over North Dakota School's Nickname

Fargo, N.D. – Six American Indian students at the University of North Dakota filed a federal lawsuit on Thursday asking to eliminate the school's Fighting Sioux nickname, one day before state officials are scheduled to meet with NCAA officials about the moniker.

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Foreign Students Fear Indiana Immigration Law Impact

MUNCIE Ind. – Indiana's new immigration law is raising concerns among international students who worry they won't be eligible for tuition waivers or fellowships that help pay for their U.S. educations.

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Poet Alleges Discrimination at Cleveland State University

An outspoken tenured professor of English at Cleveland State University whose discrimination lawsuit against the Ohio school is scheduled for a November trial has been served a termination letter only weeks before classes start, according to documents obtained exclusively by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education.

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Diverse in India: Chess Skills Elevate Student to Elite College

CHENNAI,  India -- With the blessings of his parents, VAV Rajesh made a decision at the tender age of 11 to move to this bustling city that is considered the “Mecca of Indian chess” in order to become a professional chess player.

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August 10, 2011

Minnesota Program for Immigrant Doctors Loses Funding

ST. PAUL, Minn. — A University of Minnesota program that helps immigrant doctors qualify to practice in Minnesota has fallen victim to last month's state budget agreement.

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U.S. Justice Dept. Accuses For-profit College of Breaking Law

WASHINGTON – The Obama administration and four states are accusing a private, for-profit college of illegally paying recruiters to enroll students in an $11 billion fraud, the latest action in a long-running examination of the industry's recruitment techniques and an allegation the company called “flat-out wrong.”

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Fisk University Loses More Top Officials

Fisk University, plagued by leadership turnover in recent years, has lost three key members of its administration team, say sources close to developments at the struggling school.

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Shaw University's First Female President Quits Just Days After Tornado-damaged School Reopens to Students

Just two days after Shaw University, the South's oldest historically Black college in Raleigh, N.C., reopened to students, its president Irma McClaurin resigned from her post, The News & Observer of Raleigh, N.C. reported Tuesday. 

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August 9, 2011

For-profit Colleges Respond to Increased Scrutiny

ST. LOUIS — They gather in a generic suburban office park, working-class students chasing a fast track to success: a college degree.

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Morehouse To Pay $1.2 Million After Federal Probe

ATLANTA — Morehouse College in Atlanta has agreed to pay $1.2 million to end a federal investigation into what officials call the misuse of funds intended to promote scientific study, the U.S. Department of Justice announced late Friday.

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Commentary: Lessons Learned in Downtown Los Angeles

As I walked [two weeks ago] along South Figueroa Street in downtown Los Angeles, my mind was fractured by a million disparate thoughts, most of them weighty matters only in my head. I was in Southern California for the annual convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and had several appointments on that beautiful day. In typical fashion, I was late for my first appointment and was oblivious to all around me.

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Maintaining Journalism Tradition, Education at HBCUs

When Gwendolyn Denwiddie graduated from Fisk University in May, her accomplishments exceeded the bachelor’s degree she raised above her head in celebration. Denwiddie had succeeded at something that other Fisk students had been attempting for more than a decade.

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August 1, 2011

MLK Memorial dedication week honors lifelong crusade

A long-awaited memorial for Atlanta's most famous native son and the movement he led opens later this month on the National Mall in Washington. The official dedication of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial will take place on Aug. 28, putting the renowned civil rights leader in the pantheon of national heroes previously reserved for presidents.

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Making the Work of Black Scientists Accessible to the Public

Since 2000, The HistoryMakers (www.thehistorymakers.com) web campaign has been conducting interviews with prominent African-Americans in fields such as business, education, entertainment, law, music and religion. So far, 2,000 people in more than 80 U.S. cities and towns have been interviewed.

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Charter Schools and College Access

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Erica Cohen had been seriously down on her luck when she found herself waiting for her number to be called in the public lottery held by SEED School of Washington, D.C.

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July 22, 2011

A Population Changes, Uneasily

WASHINGTON — This city, the country’s first to have an African-American majority and one of its earliest experiments in black self-government, is passing a milestone.

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July 18, 2011

Harvard Training College Teachers on Black History

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. – Every semester, Cheryl Carpenter tries to think of new ways to introduce Zora Neale Hurston's "Their Eyes Were Watching God" to her college students.

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Clothing Company Granted Opportunity to Defend Against Delta Sigma Theta Trademark Infringement Lawsuit

A federal judge in Washington, D.C., has given a New York City clothing company more time to defend itself in a trademark infringement lawsuit by Delta Sigma Theta sorority.

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July 12, 2011

Redemption in Birmingham

CHRIS McNAIR, symbol of the civil rights struggle in Birmingham, Ala., reported to federal prison last month, bereft of the media respect that has been his companion for most of his 85 years. In 1963, Mr. McNair’s 11-year-old daughter, Denise, died along with three other black Sunday school girls in the Ku Klux Klan bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church. Mr. McNair, then a school-teacher turned photographer, transcended his anguish to become an agent of community healing, a popular politician whom white people appreciated for his policy of not bringing up his child’s martyrdom.

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July 11, 2011

Freeing the Unjustly Imprisoned: Innocence Project Affiliates Flourish, Many Tied to Universities

In 1998, Anthony Porter was literally a dead man walking. He had been convicted of a 1982 double murder and was on Illinois’ death row. Both the Illinois and U.S. supreme courts had turned away his appeals for a new trial, and he came within 48 hours of execution. However, in 1999, he was found innocent after the actual killer gave a videotaped confession to two journalism students of the Innocence Project (IP), which has a strong claim to be the most successful example of student activism since the Civil Rights Movement.

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University of Delaware Art Conservationists Restore Historic African-American Mural

WILMINGTON, Del. – From outside the deserted Wilmington building, passersby would have no idea that an authentic, nearly 70-year-old Aaron Douglas painting dominates the living room inside.

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Native American Rights Lawyer, Former University of Colorado Law Dean Dies at 68

BOULDER, Colo. - David Getches, a leading American Indian rights lawyer and former dean of the University of Colorado School of Law, has died. He was 68.

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NAACP blasts CNN: No African American anchors in prime time

CNN's newly announced prime-time news lineup has come under fire by the NAACP, which claims the slate continues a multi-network trend that excludes African Americans from prime-time slots as anchors and hosts.

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June 30, 2011

Cheating In College Is Widespread — But Why?

There's an electronic resource out there that's providing college students with inventive new ways of maintaining their GPAs without required reading, tedious essays or hours of studying. It's the Internet, and it has led to a new kind of cheating that educators are trying to combat with technology and another look at what counts as plagiarism.

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June 10, 2011

Commentary: Increasing the MBA Diversity Pipeline – What's the Problem – the Pipe or the Line?

Cultivating an interest in business and business careers among historically underrepresented minorities—African-Americans, Hispanic Americans and Native Americans—has been a formidable challenge for the business community.

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Diversity Still Matters in Michigan

It has been almost five years since Michigan voters chose to ban race-conscious programs from state-funded institutions. The impact of the decision was swift and painful for many, particularly in the state’s public higher education landscape.

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Honor for black lawmakers unveiled at capitol

The Alabama Capitol has a new marker honoring black lawmakers who served in the Legislature during Reconstruction. The marker unveiled Thursday displays a plaque to honor the 80 black members of the Legislature who served after the Civil War from 1868 until 1878.

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June 6, 2011

FAMU and Tennessee State Join HBCUsOnline Roster

HBCUsOnline, an online education services organization that offers a wide range of professional certificates for information technology, has partnered with two more colleges, Florida A & M University and Tennessee State University. The schools join Texas Southern University. The program, spearheaded by Tom Joyner, a syndicated radio talk show host, seeks to attract adults to online classes.

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May 31, 2011

Fisk 'Family Feud' Enters Its Next Chapter

Fisk University’s legal battle over its efforts to raise funds for the school by monetizing part of its prestigious Stieglitz Collection of photographs and paintings entered another testy chapter this month, demonstrating that the clash among Fisk, the state of Tennessee and an angry group of Fisk alumni over the future of the school is far from resolution.

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May 27, 2011

Critics Question Effectiveness of U.S. Civil Rights Commission

WASHINGTON - More than halfway through his term, President Obama is moving to wrest control of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights from Republican appointees, but questions are being raised about its future and its ability to create a better America for victims of discrimination.

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May 26, 2011

HBCU Conference Schools Take Big Hits in Latest NCAA Academic Progress Report

INDIANAPOLIS – NCAA President Mark Emmert expects athletes at historically Black colleges and universities to make the grade and he's willing to help after seeing the results of the latest Academic Progress Rates.

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Report: Pay Disparities Persist for Minorities and Women With College Degrees

While bachelor’s degrees bring their holders higher salaries than they would otherwise earn, not all degrees from the various majors have the same economic value, and disturbing pay disparities persist for minorities and women.

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Gov. Haley Barbour Apologizes to Activists Arrested in Mississippi

JACKSON, Miss. – Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour has apologized to dozens of civil rights activists who were carted off to the state's notorious Parchman prison in the 1960s for attempting to desegregate interstate travel.

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Hundreds of Civil Rights Movement Era Love Letters To Be Donated in Houston

HOUSTON – Audrey Hoffman's hesitant first letter, written on a college dorm mate's dare, apologized for seeming "bold and wrong." The recipient, William Lawson, a seminarian and neophyte preacher in rural Kansas who had resigned himself to life as a celibate missionary, was surprised and charmed.

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May 19, 2011

Taking Action to Abandon Offensive American Indian Mascots Often Mired in Controversy

For eight decades, students at Southeast Missouri State University, a mid-sized college located on the banks of the Mississippi River in rural, conservative Cape Girardeau, had proudly rooted for its sports teams, the Indians. The old-timers said the name was adopted in the mid-1920s to honor the legacy of American Indians and their warrior traditions. The teams had an Indian mascot. There was an Indian logo. And the entrance to Houck Stadium, the university’s football arena on the edge of campus, was dominated by an imposing, 30-foot-tall statue of an American Indian man.

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May 18, 2011

Town Hall Meeting: Shortage of Black Male Teachers Looms as Many Choose High-Paying Professions

BOWIE, Md. — In order to make a difference in the lives of students, teachers must bring a sense of dedication into the classroom and look beyond the desire for a hefty salary, proclaimed a highly acclaimed Maryland teacher Tuesday while urging college students at a town hall meeting to consider teaching as a profession.

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May 17, 2011

Octavia Geans Vivian, 83: A tower of the civil rights movement

Octavia and the Rev. C.T. Vivian became a go-to duo for the civil rights movement when they married 58 years ago. She was committed to the same social causes as her husband, a freedom fighter who stood firm for justice, equality and fairness for blacks.

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May 16, 2011

Sixty Years Later, Black Educator Gets Recognition at University of Arkansas Graduation

BALTIMORE — If you scour the annals of Little Rock’s racial history, the name Lothaire Scott Green isn’t likely to be listed among the better-known Black icons and power brokers of Arkansas’ capital city. Yet this genteel Southern lady, stalwart public school teacher and intrepid mother of three, including Ernest Green of the Little Rock Nine and the first Black graduate of Central High School, came to symbolize for her family and community what it meant to take a stand.

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May 12, 2011

Anniston and the burning bus: We are obligated to confront our past, no matter how ugly it may be

The 1961 Freedom Ride attack lays like an open wound in Anniston’s history, stubbornly refusing to heal, impossible to ignore. It represented a dividing line between the past and future. It exposed the community to national and international condemnation. It tarnished the Model City image that civic leaders had been cultivating since the 19th century. It remains Anniston’s most shameful and painful incident.

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May 11, 2011

U.S. Higher Education Confronts Historic Financial Challenges

WASHINGTON — Despite a nascent economic recovery, education advocates, policymakers and other leaders continue to sound concerns over U.S. higher education’s long-term viability and productivity.

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Policy Report Cites Prison Population as Target for College Attainment

In the national push to increase degree attainment throughout the United States, policy-makers should focus more attention on providing post-secondary education to those who are behind bars—even if it means easing restrictions on the Internet in prison to do so.

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Tennessee Appeals Proposed Sale of Fisk University's O'Keeffe Art

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Tennessee's attorney general is appealing a decision that will allow FiskUniversity to sell a portion of an art collection donated to the school by the late painter Georgia O'Keeffe.

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School Residency Arrests Raise Fairness Questions

HARTFORD, Conn. – A homeless single mother's arrest on charges she intentionally enrolled her son in the wrong school district by using her baby sitter's address is raising questions about uneven enforcement of residency rules as budget-conscious cities nationwide crack down on out-of-towners in their classrooms.

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May 10, 2011

Fifty Years Later, Students Retrace 1961 Freedom Ride

RICHMOND, Va. – Charles Reed Jr. skipped his college graduation ceremony to do something much more significant to him: retracing the original 1961 Freedom Ride and paying tribute to those who helped win the civil rights that his generation enjoys.

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The pros and cons of the online MBA

Online MBA courses are designed for convenient access from anywhere in the world with an internet connection. If they choose, students can embark on the tough challenge of studying part time while working to pay the bills, looking after a family, or even studying full time on the opposite side of the world from where the actual business school is based.

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MBA students at top business schools are borrowing more money than ever to pay for their degrees

The average debt carried on the back of graduating MBAs at Wharton increased by nearly $5,000 last year to a record $109,836, the highest debt burden reported by any business school. Wharton MBAs now graduate with debt that is more than a third higher than their counterparts at Harvard Business School and Stanford’s Graduate School of Business.

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Historically Black Schools Turning to Capital Campaigns

When Dr. Frank G. Pogue Jr. arrived at Louisiana’s Grambling State University as interim president a year ago, he quickly made an unexpected and unpleasant discovery. The school’s primary funding source—the state—was steadily reeling in the cash line and cutting taxpayer support for higher education, not just at Grambling but all over the state.

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John Lewis recounts Freedom Rides, 50 years later

The murders of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Kennedy in 1968 nearly killed John Lewis. The men were models for the young man from Troy, Ala., now in his 12th term in the U.S. House of Representatives. Lewis plans to serve as long as voters in Georgia’s 5th district will allow. Retirement, he said, “is not in my DNA.”

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White House releases Obama birth certificate

The White House on Wednesday morning released the president's long form birth certificate (pdf) in an attempt to put "birther" questions to rest.

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May 3, 2011

Show Me Your Papers

After this morning's birth certificate press conference at the white house prompted everyone on earth to say, wow, so that happened. msnbc contributor goldie taylor was much more lokairbs and eloquent than anybody else i know. she posted a remarkable response at the grio.com. my initial reaction was to put it on cue cars and have you read it while i shut up. we realized it would be smarter to let her explain it. let her tell it. we've never done this before. a sort of guest on air op ed, but i think this occasion calls for it.

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Scholar Combines Math and Social Justice in the Classroom

Dr. Chawne Kimber is using the little-known discipline of mathematics of social justice to teach Lafayette College students to examine numbers differently. An algebraist, topologist, and associate professor of mathematics, Kimber also grooms the next generation of STEM professionals as director of Lafayette’s six-week Summer Program to Advance Leadership (SPAL), which allows incoming freshmen from underrepresented minority groups to get a jump-start on college life by arriving on campus early.

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Museum Dedicated to Civil Rights Leader and Educator Benjamin Mays Opens

GREENWOOD S.C. — A museum dedicated to the life of Benjamin E. Mays, an educator who was an early inspiration to Martin Luther King Jr. and was often referred to as the father of the civil rights movement, opened last week.

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May 2, 2011

Alabama State University Conference Focuses on Globalization

About 350 business and government leaders joined scholars and educators at Alabama State University in Montgomery this week to explore economic innovation and international business opportunities.

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Southern Poverty Law Center Marks 40th Anniversary of Civil Rights Agenda

Education is key to the center, which casts a wide net in its outreach and addresses educators at all levels. About 15 percent of the subscribers to its Teaching Tolerance program are education professors at colleges.

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Talented Gymnast Reaches Pinnacle of Academic Achievement, Athletic Success

While San Jose State University gymnast Shanice Howard experienced personal fulfillment in an exemplary college gymnastics career, her stellar performance in the classroom and community service activities won her wide admiration and respect.

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Howard, Yale Debaters Meet in Third Annual Great Debate

The first debate topic was whether society should create more privately operated schools of choice; the second was whether D.C. should be granted statehood.

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May 1, 2011

Obama Administration Releases Latino Education Report

Changing demographics mean challenges facing Latino students are of importance to the entire nation, a senior U.S. Department of Education official presenting a report in Miami said Wednesday.

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Juggling Pro Baseball and College Football, Scholar-Athlete Excels in Classroom

Motivated by faith and inspired by his late father, Russell Wilson stayed focused on gridiron and academic achievement even after becoming a professional baseball player last year.

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Oklahoma Gaming Proving Profitable for Tribal Higher Education

Legalizing American Indian gaming 10 years ago has brought about a cash windfall for Oklahoma's tribal colleges, even if it is indirect.

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50th Anniversary of the 1961 Freedom Rides

Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the 1961 Freedom Rides & Opening of the Freedom Rides Museum at the Historic Montgomery Greyhound Bus Station @ 210 S. Court St. Contact Alabama Historical Commission: 334-242-3184

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April 27, 2011

The Tuskegee Airmen: An Illustrated History: 1939-1949

Many documentaries, articles, museum exhibits, books, and movies have now treated what became known as the "Tuskegee Experiment", involving the black pilots who gained fame during World War II as the Tuskegee Airmen. Most of these works have focused on the training of America¿s first black fighter pilots and their subsequent accomplishments during combat. This publication goes further, using captioned photographs to trace the Airmen through the stages of training, deployment, and combat actions in North Africa, Italy, and Germany. Included for the first time are depictions of the the critical support roles of doctors, nurses, mechanics, navigators, weathermen, parachute riggers, and other personnel...

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April 18, 2011

Talladega College's Amistad Murals to Go on Nationwide Tour

TALLADEGA, Ala. — Murals depicting the famed slave revolt aboard the trading ship Amistad, which have hung on the campus of Talladega College for more than 70 years, are soon going on a nationwide museum tour.

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Phonetic Clues Hint Language Is Africa-Born

A researcher analyzing the sounds in languages spoken around the world has detected an ancient signal that points to southern Africa as the place where modern human language originated.

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April 12, 2011

Alabama Voices: ASU site will best tell story

On Nov. 12, 1996, President Bill Clinton signed the law designating the 54-mile voting rights route as the Selma-to-Montgomery Historic Trail. The Alabama Department of Transportation's request to designate the Historic Trail as a National Scenic Byway and All-America Road was approved by the Federal Highway Administration.

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April 11, 2011

John Cashin Jr. Dies at 82; Campaigned for Civil Rights

John L. Cashin Jr., a civil rights campaigner who was the first black candidate for governor of Alabama since Reconstruction, mounting an unsuccessful challenge in 1970 to the arch-segregationist George C. Wallace, died on Monday in Washington, where he lived in recent years. He was 82.

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NAACP, Newt Gingrich Urge Prison Reform

The NAACP is joining Newt Gingrich in calling for a reduction in the number of state and federal prisoners, and instead using spending those savings on education.

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Hampton President William Harvey Responds to WSJ Article on HBCUs

A recent Wall Street Journal article by Jason Riley questioned the relevance of historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in today's society. He complained about President Obama's conventional approach to HBCUs and opined that "instead of more subsidies and toothless warnings to shape up," the President and federal government ought to " … remake these schools to meet today's challenges."

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April 8, 2011

Oklahoma's GOP Lawmakers Push to Abolish Affirmative Action

OKLAHOMA CITY — A Republican-backed plan to wipe out any affirmative action programs in Oklahoma appears headed for approval by the Legislature, prompting a bitter response from some minority lawmakers that it is merely a political ploy to play on racial fears and draw conservative voters to the polls. If approved, the measure would go on the 2012 state ballot.

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FAMU Board Approves President's Restructuring Plan

The Florida A&M University board of trustees on Thursday approved a major restructuring plan for the historically Black institution. University president James Ammons tied the plan to a concept of creating "the Millennial Famuan," a globally connected, critically thinking, socially conscious adult equipped for leadership in 2020 and beyond.

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April 7, 2011

Freedom Rides: The Documentary and Students Retrace the Historic Route

Meet the 2011 Student Freedom Riders

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April 6, 2011

Dr. D.M. French Dies at 86; Treated '60s Marchers

Dr. David M. French, who helped found an organization of doctors that provided medical care to marchers during the civil rights era and who later organized health care programs in 20 African nations, died on Thursday in Charlottesville, Va. He was 86 and lived in Barboursville, Va.

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Upcoming Events for the Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts & Humanitie

April 14 : [Composing Communities] "The Way We Were: A Cultural History of Vernacular Writing in 20th Century America." Lecture by Kathleen Yancey. Student Center 2227, 3:00 pm. Composing Communities is a series of conversations on writing, community, and engagement sponsored by Auburn University's Office of University Writing, Department of English and Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts & Humanities in the College of Liberal Arts...For a complete list of events, please visit our website.

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April 5, 2011

Criminal Justice Think Tank Exits Medgar Evers Campus

With its lawsuit against the City University of New York's Medgar Evers College still pending, a criminal justice think tank run by the formerly incarcerated has departed that Brooklyn campus, settling into temporary quarters as it waits for permanent digs at the State University of New York at Old Westbury.

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No ordinary Sunday: Ebenezer celebrates 125 years

Barbara Smith has attended Ebenezer Baptist Church for the past 52 years. Martin Luther King Jr. baptized her when she was nine, an event she recalls with pride. She remembers sermons by his father, Martin Luther King Sr., and the tragic passing of King Jr.

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Atlanta council honors former SNCC members

Atlanta City Councilman Michael Julian Bond paid tribute to a group of women close to his heart at Monday's council meeting – former civil rights workers who have recently contributed to the newly-published civil rights history book "Hands on the Freedom Plow."

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March 29, 2011

FAMU Restructuring Plan Would Shut Down Numerous Programs

Faced with mounting financial challenges, Florida A&M University President James Ammons announced a major overhaul Monday, proposing to close or merge about two dozen programs, including a large contingent in the College of Education.

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HBCU Sexual Assault Study Released

Often precipitated by the consumption of alcohol, attempted or completed sexual assaults directly affect about 14 percent of all female students on the campuses of historically Black colleges and universities, but the attacks often go unreported due to shame, guilt or fear.

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March 28, 2011

Early release hearing set in Civil Rights death case

MARION, Ala. (AP) - A judge in Marion has scheduled a hearing April 14 on a request by a former Alabama state trooper, who wants to be released early from his six-month jail sentence for killing a man at a civil rights demonstration 46 years ago.

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Women From Historic Student Civil Rights Group Tell Their Story

When Judy Richardson was navigating her way through her freshman year at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania, she got distracted from her full-ride, four-year scholarship by efforts to force the school to boost the wages of its all-Black cafeteria staff. She joined the campaign to help the workers.

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March 25, 2011

Many U.S. Blacks Moving to South, Reversing Trend

WASHINGTON — The percentage of the nation's black population living in the South has hit its highest point in half a century, according to census data released Thursday, as younger and more educated black residents move out of declining cities in the Northeast and Midwest in search of better opportunities.

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New NAACP Seeing Diverse Chapter Leaders

WORCESTER, Mass. ­— The NAACP's newly revived Worcester chapter elected a 28-year-old openly gay Black man as its president this month. Last year in New Jersey, a branch of the organization outside Atlantic City chose a Honduran immigrant to lead. And in Mississippi, the Jackson State University chapter recently turned to a 30-something White man.

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March 18, 2011

CIA Chief Leon Panetta Talks Diversity at Morehouse College

ATLANTA — CIA Director Leon Panetta on Tuesday told students at the nation's only all-male historically Black college that the agency needs a more diverse workforce that represents the world it engages.

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Miss. museum hosts Freedom Riders exhibit

JACKSON, Miss. – The Mississippi Museum of Art in Jackson opens an exhibit Saturday to honor the 50th anniversary of the Freedom Riders.

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U.S. Hispanic growth outstrips census estimates: study

PHOENIX (Reuters) – Growth of the U.S. Hispanic population is so fast and dynamic that it has outstripped estimates by the U.S. Census Bureau, according to a study released on Tuesday. The report by the Pew Hispanic Center think-tank found that the Latino population in the 33 states so far tallied in the 2010 Census totaled 38.7 million, 1.5 percent higher than the U.S. Census Bureau's own previous estimates.

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March 10, 2011

UMKC Professor Pearlie Johnson Uses Quilts to Teach Black History

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Quilts are being used to teach Black history at the University of Missouri-Kansas City. Pearlie Johnson, a visiting assistant professor in the College of Arts and Sciences' Black studies program, says "My grandmother introduced me to quilts and quilting when I was younger."

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March 4, 2011

Singer/actor LaTour, 84, dies in Los Angeles

Singer and actor E.D. Nixon Jr., better known by his stage name Nick LaTour, died Monday night due to complications from cancer, according to his godson Michael Eaddy. Eaddy was by the side of LaTour, the son of famed civil rights activist E.D. Nixon, when he passed away at his Los Angeles home. He was 84.

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Restoring a part of history

TALLADEGA — Talladega College held its Hale A. Woodruff Mural Restoration Project and Exhibition Agreement Signing in Savery Library Wednesday, drawing in a mixed crowd of visitors from the art, academic, and media world.

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March 3, 2011

Can Universities Keep the Minority Students They Woo?

BETHLEHEM, Pa. — Lehigh University did a good job wooing Nezy Smith. A Lehigh admissions officer met the African-American honor roll student at her high school in Lebanon, Pa., then kept in touch for a year, urging her to visit the campus and helping her to fill out complex financial aid forms.

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March 1, 2011

The famed Morehouse College Glee Club celebrates its 100th year

The Morehouse College Glee Club — a historically black, all-male choir that's sung at the Olympics, the Super Bowl and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s funeral — puts honest work into doing its best.

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February 28, 2011

Black women paved economic inroads

Many people know about Madame C.J. Walker, born Sarah Breedlove, who founded her own hair care company and was the first female African-American millionaire in our nation. Most don't know about Maggie Lena Walker, the first woman to charter a bank in the USA.

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Jeremy Bernard: A historic choice for White House social secretary

The White House is set to make news and history this afternoon when it announces the new social secretary. Jeremy Bernard, currently the chief of staff to the U.S. ambassador to France, will become the third person to hold the job in the Obama administration. But he will be the first man and the first openly gay person to be the first family's and the executive mansion's chief event planner and host.

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February 25, 2011

The Future of Higher Education: Non-Profit or For-Profit?

Last year, the U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO) issued a blistering report that found many for-profit institutions have misled students during the recruiting process, encouraged students to falsify financial aid applications to maximize aid, and made empty, unachievable promises of career advancement.

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February 22, 2011

Islam’s Connection to Black America, U.S. Slavery Explored in Mississippi Conferences

JACKSON, Miss. — While Mississippi’s racial politics loomed awkwardly as much as the state flags incorporating the Confederate Battle emblem flying on nearby buildings, scholars gathered in the state capital this past weekend for two conferences, one on the legacy of Islamic West Africa, another on slavery.

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Feds: Huntsville school board needs to work on racial inequities

HUNTSVILLE, Alabama -- After waiting 38 months for word from Washington, the Huntsville school board finally peeled open the results of its desegregation review: Fix more things. Try again later.

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February 21, 2011

Campus Racial Flaps Dog Alabama Despite Progress

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Recent flaps over racially offensive language at the University of Alabama fit a pattern that’s dogged the state’s flagship school since it was integrated: Missteps along the path to greater diversity and inclusion often make more of an impression than positive strides do.

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North Dakota House Panel Says University Must Keep Fighting Sioux Name

BISMARCK, N.D. — A North Dakota House committee last week supported ordering the University of North Dakota to keep its Fighting Sioux nickname, which the school wants to discard this summer to avoid a confrontation with the NCAA.

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February 20, 2011

Black History is American History

This past week, I made a guest visit (via Skype) in Professor Lori Patton Davis’ History of American Higher Education course at the University of Denver. I was asked to talk about an article that I recently wrote on stereotypes of Black college presidents. The article focuses on the origins of these stereotypes and illuminates the complex actions of HBCU presidents during the civil rights era.

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February 18, 2011

Barbour won't denounce Confederate license plates

JACKSON — Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour said Tuesday he won't denounce a Southern heritage group's proposal for a state-issued license plate that would honor Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest, who was an early leader of the Ku Klux Klan.

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Civil rights museum gets boost

JACKSON — Lawmakers are fast-tracking a proposal to build a civil rights museum and a Mississippi history museum on state-owned property in downtown Jackson.

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February 17, 2011

Black History Quiz Bowl

Sign up a four-person team from your dorm or organization. Trophies awarded for top 3 teams! Register your team & pick up study packets on Thursday, Feb. 3 - Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2011 at the History & Political Science Dept, George W. Trenholm Hall, Room 210.

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February 16, 2011

Ohio Universities Defend Affirmative Action Strategies in Their Admissions

Two universities that are accused in a new report of giving minority students an unfair edge in the admissions process defended their practices Tuesday as being legitimate strategies to expand access and enhance diversity on campus.

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February 15, 2011

Slaves Hid African Charms in Maryland Greenhouse

BALTIMORE -- The greenhouse on the Maryland-based Wye House plantation where famed abolitionist Frederick Douglass spent part of his childhood was not as uniquely European as once thought: Its furnace was built by slaves, who hid distinctly African touches within it to ward off bad spirits, researchers said.

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Miles College aims to become a university

BIRMINGHAM — Miles College President George French says the school is planning to add graduate-level courses and become a university.

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TV Series Tries to Revive Civil Rights Cold Cases

The murder has never been solved: On Feb. 27, 1967, Wharlest Jackson, a father of five and the treasurer of the Natchez, Miss., branch of the N.A.A.C.P., was killed by a car bomb, making him just one of dozens of victims of racial violence during the civil rights era. To add an element of horror, Mr. Jackson’s 8-year-old son heard the explosion, bicycled to the scene and discovered his own father.

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Iraqi Defector 'Curveball' Says He Lied About WMD

The Iraqi defector known as "Curveball," who provided the basis for U.S. claims that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction, has admitted that he lied to intelligence agencies, a published report says.

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February 14, 2011

The 'Two or More Races' Dilemma

The new Education Department ruling is trying to move us beyond the infamous "one drop" rule -- that one drop of black blood makes you black. In fact millions of Americans come from multiple races and ethnicities, and they should never be asked to choose one over another.

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February 11, 2011

HBCU President Brings Sex and Health Education to the Campus

Dr. Walter Kimbrough knew that there was nothing normal about the spate of recent statistics erupting in the headlines about Blacks and the consequences of their sexual activity. In fact, he said, the numbers were “mind boggling,” especially knowing that African-Americans are the most religious group in the U.S., according to a 2009 study by the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life.

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February 9, 2011

Malcolm X Trove Hidden During Feud

A feud over the estate of Betty Shabazz, the widow of Malcolm X, has created divisions among the couple’s six daughters and has resulted in something none of them had intended: keeping part of their father’s legacy from the public.

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February 7, 2011

Budget Cuts Threaten a Hidden Treasure in Watts

LOS ANGELES — The Watts Towers rose up against a clear blue sky as James Janisse unlocked the 10-foot-high gate that surrounds the soaring outdoor sculpture. “Behold the work of the man,” said Mr. Janisse, a tour guide, and his audience took it in: the Gaudiesque mashup of towers, cathedrals, fountains and ships, constructed from pipes, broken bottles, seashells and cracked ceramic, climbing 100 feet into the air.

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February 7, 2011

Emory University Hosts Conference on Slavery

ATLANTA — More than 30 schools from across the country met this weekend at EmoryUniversity to discuss the history and legacy of slavery’s role in higher education.

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February 6, 2011

Conservative Democrats switch to GOP across the Deep South

For Democrats, Ashley Bell was the kind of comer that a party builds a future on: A young African American lawyer, he served as president of the College Democrats of America, advised presidential candidate John Edwards and spoke at the 2004 Democratic National Convention in Boston. But after his party's midterm beat-down in November, Bell, a commissioner in northern Georgia's Hall County, jumped ship. He joined the Republicans.

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February 3, 2011

A Proud Heritage

NASHVILLE — When Reavis L. Mitchell Jr. was plowing his way toward a doctoral degree in the 1960s and 1970s, hardly a word was taught about Black soldiers in the Civil War.

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February 1, 2011

Small-town paper links ex-Klansman to 1964 killing

FERRIDAY, La. – Arthur Leonard Spencer says sure, he made some mistakes back when he was a "snot-nose kid," like joining the Ku Klux Klan. But murder? No, the 71-year-old Spencer says, a small-town weekly paper got it wrong when it reported recently that he may have been involved in burning down a black man's shoe repair shop in 1964 with the owner inside.

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February 1, 2011

Duncan calls on black men to become teachers

U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan and filmmaker Spike Lee teamed up Monday to urge more black men to consider teaching.

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January 31, 2011

Colorado Firm Wins $74,000 Contract To Study UNO/SUNO Merger

BATON ROUGE, La.— A Colorado consulting firm will be paid as much as $74,000 to study a proposal to merge Southern University at New Orleans with the nearby University of New Orleans campus.

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January 27, 2011

Louisiana Merger Study Puts Southern University Chief, Katrina-damaged Schools in Spotlight

NEW ORLEANS – When Ronald Mason resigned as president of Jackson State University last year to take the helm of Louisiana’s Southern University System, he was the focus of a bitter debate over a proposed merger of some of Mississippi’s historically Black universities. He was against it; then he was for it – sort of. Mason came up with his own plan, but opponents leveled all proposals before they got traction.

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January 24, 2011

High-Profile Black Political Scientist to Lead New Center on Race, Gender and Politics in the South

Dr. Melissa Harris-Perry, the witty Black political scientist who has developed a loyal following as a television pundit on MSNBC and a columnist for The Nation, has decided to leave her teaching post at Princeton University to join the faculty at Tulane University, where she will head up a new center focused on race, gender and politics in the South.

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January 21, 2011

Mays, at Home in Harlem, Connects With Its Children

Harlem has had so many magical days; Friday offered yet another, when the great Willie Mays came back home. More than 200 students from P.S. 46 gathered inside the school’s auditorium to listen to Mays talk about his life in Harlem as the Giants’ center fielder.

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January 19, 2011

Dr. Smith’s Back Room

The decades leading up to the Civil War provided New York’s black leaders with a severe schooling in political activism: they moved from local to national politics, from establishing all-black organizations to participating in interracial societies, from avoidance of party politics to full involvement. When the Civil War broke out, they were ready to make their voices heard.

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January 19, 2011

Scholar Deciphers Census Data, Political Climate After Reapportionment

When the Census Bureau begins cranking out more official results this winter of the 2010 decennial census, political scientist Robert A. Holmes will be poring over the data to see what it portends for Blacks and other minorities and how they can use it to sustain political momentum in this decade.

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January 16, 2011

An Assassination’s Long Shadow

TODAY, millions of people on another continent are observing the 50th anniversary of an event few Americans remember, the assassination of Patrice Lumumba. A slight, goateed man with black, half-framed glasses, the 35-year-old Lumumba was the first democratically chosen leader of the vast country, nearly as large as the United States east of the Mississippi, now known as the Democratic Republic of Congo.

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January 14, 2011

Martin Luther King and Robert Graetz

Although the social revolution led by Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. grew out of the black church, from even the earliest days of the movement there were white foot soldiers, too. King initially came to national prominence while leading the bus boycott in Montgomery, Alabama, where he was serving in his first job as a local pastor, and working closely with him there was a young white pastor named Robert Graetz.

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January 14, 2011

Mississippi Governor: Time To Build Civil Rights Museum

JACKSON, Miss. – Possible presidential contender Gov. Haley Barbour—under fire recently for comments that critics claim minimized the problems of Mississippi's civil rights era—said Tuesday night that his state should build a museum dedicated to the movement.

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January 14, 2011

Broad Racial Disparities Seen in Americans' Ills

White people in the United States die of drug overdoses more often than other ethnic groups. Black people are hit proportionately harder by AIDS, strokes and heart disease. And American Indians are more likely to die in car crashes.

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January 9, 2011

ASU landmark gets face lift

Alabama State University's bell on top of Bibb Graves Hall recently received a face lift. The cupola on Bibb Graves Hall, known to many as Bell Tower, has been a part of the school for more than 80 years. During Christmas break the wood frames, paint and bronze all were replaced...

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